Light, medium, or heavy oxidation?

Maintenance & Launching

Light, medium, or heavy oxidation?

Postby jfine » Mon Jun 09, 2014 1:32 pm

I've been slacking as a new (to us) sailboat owner. The boat has gone a few seasons without a wax and is starting to oxidize. How do I determine if it's light, medium, or heavy oxidation?

Here are a few shots of the hull (https://www.dropbox.com/sh/l9gz6af1e8os ... IxREqCYaia). Also I did buy some Star brite Instant Hull Cleaner but haven't had a chance to remove the scum line.

Also, I'm thinking about using 3M Restorer and Wax or Star brite One Step Heavy Duty Cleaner Wax with PTEF. If anyone has a preference I'd love some input.

Thanks!
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Re: Light, medium, or heavy oxidation?

Postby NewportNewsMike » Mon Jun 09, 2014 2:49 pm

fine wrote:......How do I determine if it's light, medium, or heavy oxidation?


I may be missing something here but why does it make any difference what level of oxidation others think it is? If it offends YOU, it's heavy! :D

As to your question, I see what I would call light oxidation on the picture of the blue boot stripe - you can still tell it's blue! In the picture of the hull, I still see a good reflection of your yard, so I would call that section of the hull: none to light oxidation.

I have always had better success using separate cleaners and waxes - not a combined product that claims to do both in one step. It's more work, but it seems to last longer.

I also think that you see a lot of different answers to this question (as well as best teak treatment or bottom paints) because we do not all live in the same Summer conditions. No way the Summer season in New England, or the Pacific Northwest can come close to the brutal conditions of South Florida or the Texas coast. A product that may "shine" (no pun intended) in New England may not last a month in Miami.

The folks over at http://www.thehulltruth.com had a pretty good discussion on this subject. Take a look at http://www.thehulltruth.com/boating-for ... wax-3.html.
Mike in Newport News VA
#1258 - Simple Pleasure - SRFK
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Re: Light, medium, or heavy oxidation?

Postby jfine » Mon Jun 09, 2014 3:14 pm

Hi NewportNewsMike. I'm mainly curious what you would consider the level of oxidation because I'm comparing cleaner and waxes and one says to use with light oxidation and the other with medium to heavy. I'm new to fiberglass maintenance and I'm not sure if there is any harm that would come from using the heavy if the oxidation was considered light. It makes sense that the all in ones wouldn't be as good as multiple steps but I'm just looking for a quick fix so we can get down on the mooring as soon as possible. ;-)
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Re: Light, medium, or heavy oxidation?

Postby NewportNewsMike » Mon Jun 09, 2014 3:50 pm

OK - I hear what you say: You want to fix the problem with as little "overkill" as possible.

I do not have any experience that would lead me to believe that using a "heavy oxidation" product on actual "light oxidation" would cause problems by being overly harsh to the hull's gelcoat. I am not sure whether this is a problem or not. Hopefully, others will be along shortly with more insight than I have.

As to your stains on the waterline: I have a couple of suggestions on products to use if the one you purchased does not do the trick to your satisfaction. Over the years, I have had success with a product called "FSR" - stands for Fiberglass Stain Remover, and acetone.

If you use acetone, you need to be careful because it will also remove a little bottom paint and give you a little color "smear" on the fiberglass that you then have to clean off (using more acetone, which can cause "smears"... and around you go). When I use acetone sometimes (if I remember) I will cover the edge of the bottom paint with some masking tape to prevent the "smears".

Although the traditionalist are going to start screaming, my solution to waterline stains and waterline slime and barnacle growth is to raise the height of the bottom paint another 2 - 3 inches (or whatever it takes to cover the area under discussion). The stains may still be there, but they do not show up on the bottom paint the way they do on a white hull. If you decide to go the route of raising the bottom paint, you will need to figure out whether your boot strip is within the gelcoat, or is an added on vinyl graphic. If gelcoat, go ahead and paint away. If vinyl graphic, you will need to remove it first - do not paint over vinyl graphics.

Keep in mind the fastest way to the mooring is paint the bottom and launch it! You cannot see any hull oxidation or waterline scum marks from the cockpit! :D

If you do find a good cleaner or wax or combo product that does the trick for you, let us what worked for you.

Happy Sailing.
Mike in Newport News VA
#1258 - Simple Pleasure - SRFK
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Re: Light, medium, or heavy oxidation?

Postby jfine » Mon Jun 09, 2014 3:59 pm

I purchased some Star brite Hull Cleaner and Deck Cleaner over the weekend and am going to give it a shot tonight. I'll make sure to take a few before and after photos. I'm also planning on hitting the bottom with a fresh coat of VC-17. I've read up a bit on it and other than mixing and the rapid evaporation people say it goes on pretty easily. I am hopeful that using a product meant for heavier oxidation won't do much harm but I'm going to test in a small area first. The top side (non-non-skid) has virtually no reflection left so I'm pretty sure that'll need the heavier duty stuff. Star brite just got back to me on the photos as well and they recommended the heavier duty stuff so I'm hoping I'll be good there as well. Fingers crossed!
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Re: Light, medium, or heavy oxidation?

Postby Mattw79 » Tue Jun 10, 2014 7:47 am

If it's an older boat (mine is an 87), I'm sold on Poliglow. I'm beginning my third season with this boat and you can see the level of oxidation from the before pic. The first season I did a light wet sanding, rubbing compound, and then wax which made a big improvement. But the boot strip never really popped and always looked faded/ dull. Then I tried poli ox for the oxidation, and about 5 coats of poliglow which is by far less work than rubbing compound and waxing. This year I just washed the hull and added two more coats of poliglow as maintenance. Nobody believes this boat is 27 years old now. You can see your reflection in the hull.
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Re: Light, medium, or heavy oxidation?

Postby shnool » Tue Jun 10, 2014 1:57 pm

This is nothing more than cheap rubbing compound (starboard done, port not touched):
Image
Then cheap turtle wax:
Image

Both of these images make me wish my present boats gelcoat wasn't completely trashed, I'd rather polish/wax, than paint any day of the week.
- former owner 1989 Capri 22 hull number 513, standard rig wing keel Mark I race package -
Then I upgraded to a 1982 Capri 25 fin keel (fun boat!)
Former 1982 S2 7.9 weighted daggerboard, with outboard (also a fun boat),
NOW 1983 WD Schock Wavelength 24
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Re: Light, medium, or heavy oxidation?

Postby csinnett » Wed Jun 11, 2014 10:37 pm

Everything I've heard about poliglow says it's amazing. I used starbrite on Verboten but that was after a buffing with a compound for light oxidation.

I'd be cautious about getting the non-skid too shiny. Shiny, to me, means slippery. Slippery is bad!

FWIW, my problem area is the coach roof and cockpit. They're pretty oxidized and it's really hard to work them with a polisher because there's so many sail control bits sticking out.
Chris
FKTR Catalina Capri 22 #893, 'Verboten
Albany, Oregon
http://sailingverboten.blogspot.com
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Re: Light, medium, or heavy oxidation?

Postby Mattw79 » Thu Jun 12, 2014 7:18 am

I agree and only use the the poliglow below the rub rail. But it's held up great for me with only one treatment a year.
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